ONLINE COLLABORATION PRINCIPLES

Randy Garrison

Abstract


This paper uses the community of inquiry model to describe the principles of collaboration. The principles describe social and cognitive presence issues associated with the three functions of teaching presence—design, facilitation and direction. Guidelines are discussed for each of the principles.


Keywords


Online Learning,Community of Inquiry,Social Presence,Cognitive Presence,Teaching Presence,Reflection,Discourse,Facilitation

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References


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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.24059/olj.v10i1.1768