USING ASYNCHRONOUS LEARNING IN REDESIGN: REACHING AND RETAINING THE AT-RISK STUDENT

Carol A. Twigg

Abstract


The primary alternative structure for large-enrollment courses, the multiple-section model, suffers from problems of its own. In theory it allows greater interaction with students, but in practice, sections are often quite large and are dominated by the same presentation techniques as used in larger courses. In addition, the multiple-section model suffers from a lack of coordination. As a result, course outcomes vary considerably and, more important, are not always consistent with students' abilities. Clearly, making significant improvements in first-year courses can have a major impact on student success and retention.


Keywords


Asynchronous Learning,Introductory Courses,Redesign,At Risk Students

Full Text:

PDF

References


http://www.center.rpi.edu/PewGrant.html

http://www.center.rpi.edu/

http://teleeducation.nb.ca/nosignificantdifference/

http://www.center.rpi.edu/PewGrant/Tool.html

http://www.center.rpi.edu/PewGrant/RD3 Award/UNM.html

http://www.center.rpi.edu/PewGrant/RD2 Award/UI.html

http://www.center.rpi.edu/PewGrant/rd1award/rio.html

http://www.center.rpi.edu/PewGrant/RD3%20Award/FGCU.html

http://www.center.rpi.edu/PewGrant/rd1award/iupui.html




DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.24059/olj.v13i3.1663



Copyright (c) 2019 Carol A. Twigg