AN INTERPRETATIVE MODEL OF KEY HEURISTICS THAT PROMOTE COLLABORATIVE DIALOGUE AMONG ONLINE LEARNERS

Sarah Haavind

Abstract


One of the more challenging aspects of teaching online is promoting content-focused, collaborative dialogue among students. How do we move discussants beyond initial brainstorming toward more focused, deepened dialogue that clearly supports a course’s instructional goals? Garrison and Anderson’s framework for communities of inquiry illuminates the critical interplay among social presence, cognitive presence and teaching presence for learning in asynchronous, online courses. This paper describes aspects of teaching presence in Virtual High School™ classes: explicit teaching of how to engage in collaborative dialogue; collaborative activity designs and evaluation rubrics; and feedback that, supported by attention to maintaining social presence, helped to promote substantive, collaborative dialogue or
cognitive presence.


Keywords


Online Learning,Community of Inquiry,Discourse,Teaching Presence,Cognitive Presence,Discourse Analysis

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References


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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.24059/olj.v11i3.1720



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