WHY DO HIGHER-EDUCATION INSTITUTIONS PURSUE ONLINE EDUCATION?

Stephen Schiffman, Karen Vignare, Christine Geith

Abstract


Using a unique item included for the first time in the Sloan Consortium’s 2006 national survey of online learning, the authors analyze the reasons why higher-education institutions engage in online learning. Nine reasons are explored from contributing to extension efforts to returning a surplus. Eight of the nine reasons are found to vary in importance depending on the type of institution. Significant differences were found for associate-level institutions, for-profit institutions and large-enrollment institutions. The authors examine the findings for access and quality themes.


Keywords


Online Education,Business Models,Business Strategy,Institutional Mission,Organizational Context,Organizational Goals,Access,Quality,Revenue

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References


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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.24059/olj.v11i2.1727



Copyright (c) 2019 Stephen Schiffman, Karen Vignare, Christine Geith