THE WEARINESS OF THE FLESH: REFLECTIONS ON THE LIFE OF THE MIND IN AN ERA OF ABUNDANCE

Paul B. Gandel, Richard N. Katz

Abstract


The invention of the printing press reduced higher education’s learning-resource scarcity. Access to learning increased, and this democratization of education indirectly contributed to the idea of political democracy in the western world. As part of these political changes, equilibrium was sought between the supply of expertise needed to promote prosperity and the demand for such expertise. This equilibrium has been elusive as the world economy shifts to a reliance on intellectual capital. To complicate matters, we now live in a world of staggering information abundance. How do we mange such boundless information? One answer may lie in viewing the social character of information (how information is used) as fundamental in setting information management agendas. This article presents a holistic approach to information management as one strategy to create effective management of information that starts with the individual and ends with collective knowledge and wisdom.


Keywords


Knowledge Economy,Information Abundance,Information Management,Information Ecology,Personal Digital Repositories

Full Text:

PDF

References


Bible: Hebrew Ecclesiastes (1.XII.13) The Oxford Book of Verse in English Translation, Charles Tomlinson, ed.. Oxford University Press, 1980.

Bell, D. The Coming of Post-Industrial Society: A Venture in Social Forecasting. New York: Basic Books, 1973.

Lyman, P., and Varian, H. “How Much Information,” 2003. Retrieved from http://www.sims.berkeley.edu/research/projects/how-much-info-2003/ on November 7, 2003.

Lynch, C. “Life after Graduation: Beyond the Academy.” EDUCAUSE Review 38(5): 12-13, September/October, 2003.

Burns, C. “Three Mile Island: The Information Meltdown.” in Horton, F.W. and D. Lewis, Great Information Disasters, 45–55. London: ASLIB, 1991.

Myburgh, S. “Strategic Information Management: Understanding a New Reality.” The Information Management Journal 36(1): 36-43, January/February 2002.

Ackoff, R. L. “Management Misinformation Systems.” Management Sciences 14(4): B147–B156, 1967.

Nardi, B. and O’Day, V. L. Information Ecologies: Using Technology with Heart. Cambridge: MIT Press, 1999.

Davenport, T. H. Information Ecology. New York: Oxford University Press, 1997.

Bush, V. “As We May Think” Atlantic Monthly 176(00001): 101-108, July 1945.




DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.24059/olj.v8i1.1840



Copyright (c) 2019 Paul B. Gandel, Richard N. Katz