A COST-EFFECTIVE MODEL FOR TEACHING ELEMENTARY STATISTICS WITH IMPROVED STUDENT PERFORMANCE

William L. Harkness, Jill L. Lane, John T. Harwood

Abstract


Dissatisfaction with teaching a high enrollment introductory statistics course led to efforts to restructure the course to remedy the perceived problems, including lack of student participation, an excessive drain on departmental resources, failure to take into account wide differences in student learning styles, an inability of students to apply statistics after the course, and negative attitudes of students. A cost-effective redesign of the course was implemented that incorporates a learning environment that is student-oriented, involves active student participation and hands-on experience with data analysis, uses technology to reduce costs through labor-saving techniques including low-stakes computerized testing, and sharing of resources enabled by a web site for course management and delivery of course materials. Responsibility for learning basic concepts was transferred to students and motivated by readiness assessment quizzes. The redesign led to about $125,000 in cost savings to the department.


Keywords


Large Classes,Uses of technology,Readiness Assessment,Cost Effectiveness

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References


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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.24059/olj.v7i2.1850