BEYOND STUDENT PERCEPTIONS: ISSUES OF INTERACTION, PRESENCE, AND PERFORMANCE IN AN ONLINE COURSE

Anthony G. Picciano

Abstract


The research literature on Web-based learning supports the assumption that interaction is important for a successful course, yet questions exist regarding the nature and extent of the interaction and its effects on student performance. Much of the research is based on student perceptions of the quality and quantity of their interactions and how much they have learned in an online course. The purpose of this study is to examine performance in an online course in relationship to student interaction and sense of presence in the course. Data on multiple independent (measures of interaction and presence) and dependent (measures of performance) variables were collected and subjected to analysis. An attempt was made to go beyond typical institutional performance measures such as grades and withdrawal rates and to examine measures specifically related to course objectives.


Keywords


Distance Learning,Interaction,Presence,Social Presence,Learning Effectiveness,Outcomes,Student Performance,Asynchronous Learning,Computer-Mediated Learning,Computer-Mediated Communications,Education Administration

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References


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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.24059/olj.v6i1.1870



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